Tag: academics

#3DSGriffith 2018 – 3 Day Startup Workshop Weekend – Highly Recommended!

Just thought I’d throw up a gallery of a few of the highlights from #3DSGriffith 2018

Without Direction, Information Alone is Worthless (A Parable)

Imagine for a moment, you arrive in Paris airport. You’re all really excited, a bit nervous. It’s your first time in Europe, let alone France – and you don’t really speak much French, except a little you learned in high school.

So where to from there? You try to get some help. You manage to get a map. Great! This big map of Paris – its got the whole city mapped out. It’s got everything you’d want to know, right? It tells you the whole story… But where am I on this map? And where am I wanting to get to? Hmm, see how a map by itself is pretty useless. That’s what it’s like with information. Information alone is worthless without direction.

They are very different concepts, though obviously they both have their place. Continue reading

My Unexpected Revolutionary Tipping Point

Every one has those moments in their life where the crisis hits, that watershed moment where you have a choice that must be made, and which way you decide to go with determine so much of what is ahead. Often the powerful thing about such moments is that your past doesn’t automatically have to be your reference point for where you go from there. It can be a moment of revival, redirection.

The past few years of my life especially actually feel like a journey from one such point to another really. But this morning, I wanted to share with you what must be one of the latest ones for me. It was definitely unexpected and unplanned for, but how I embraced it made it truly a revolutionary tipping point – a key to unlocking my personal development towards so many deep desires that I have had for a long time.

My hope in sharing a bit of my story is that when that moment comes for you, that you could embrace it and make the choice that could set your path on so much a more awesome trajectory that you could have hoped for or imagined! Sounds too good to be true? Well, read on and see. This is me! Continue reading

My easy routine for morning exercise (and other updates)

Well, it’s Wednesday morning here now, and I’ve my second two-hour Japanese workshop for my week this afternoon. So I just finished up my homework. Part of my homework was a second time that I’ve had to ask some questions to a Japanese friend (which thankfully I have a really nice one who is willing to help me out) and then rewrite her responses into a certain grammatical form for reporting something that someone has said (-と言っていました). So now that I’ve got that out of the way, just having my morning coffee, and decided that I wanted to share a few new things that I’ve got going in the past week or so.

One thing that I’ve really wanted to figure out was a really workable morning routine as far as exercise. I have my apple cider vinegar that I drink first thing, and I have my green breakfast smoothies (now with rolled oats, thanks to a suggestion from a really good friend of mine). But I hadn’t really had anything going as far as exercise.

Well, the other week I discovered an App for my phone – called “ManFIT” and it is a really well-designed app! I can set up notifications, and it has a “full-body fat-burning workout,” which I’ve been using as my easy routine for morning exercise every day now. It is just 20 minutes, and has a bit of stretching and a few cardio things (like jumping jacks). But mostly what I really love about it is the helpful notifications – and that is has some motivational music and a voice that helps you know what you’re doing, and counts down the last 5 seconds before you have a break, and then it congratulates you when you finish!

So if you were looking for something like that, I highly recommend it! Continue reading

Writing a ILAC Answer for Business Law

I’ve been thinking that I want to write a brief guide for some more academic content, to share things that I’ve learned – and one of the biggest subjects where I really learned a lot was in the course “Legal Issues for Managers” (which has been revamped as Introduction to Business Law from this trimester, and now includes more content, if it really wasn’t already enough to pack into twelve weeks already). Well, it was one of the most stimulating courses that I’ve taken so far. Not only was it really interesting to learn about the Law, Contracts, Corporations Law and Agency, Employment Relations law and Anti-Discrimination legislation in the workplace. Due to the nature of the course’s exam (being open book) I was MORE organized than ever with my study notes! I also managed to achieve 98.5% in the course, which was reported as being the highest result in the course ever! So I definitely feel on that basis alone I have a bit of weight in offering some advice in writing an ILAC answer for Business Law.

So I could presume that you already know what ILAC means, but just in case, just a brief introduction. ILAC is an acronym for a certain structure used in writing up legal advice. We were told that it was industry professionals that were behind this methodology being taught to us in the course, and really I can see why. It really sets things out nicely.

  1. I – Issues – Where you state the particular issues that are involved in your hypothetical response, formed as questions to be answered by the end of your response.
  2. L – Law – Where you outline the legislation and case law involved in your response, with a brief label for each as to the basic legal principle drawn from it.
  3. A – Application – This is the biggest part of the answer, where, in essay form, you work your way, step by step, through the Law mentioned above, and explain the principles that they contain, and then apply the principles of the Law directly to the facts of your hypothetical.
  4. C – Conclusion – Here is where you go back and provide in brief an answer to your issues, including whatever procedures should be followed and available remedies.

So that’s the form in brief. Obviously, different types of Law will have a little different approach in terms of what kinds of issues you address and even what logical order you would follow. (In our course, we were given a Template to follow for Agency and Anti-Discrimination, as these were the main ILACs to be written in our final exam. So obviously pay attention to these, and then key your notes into these templates.) Continue reading

Where Do You Fall on the Diffusion of Innovation Curve?

Have you heard of the diffusion of innovation curve? I first encountered this model in my Intro to Marketing course last year (2017). I actually never realised that the model was more than 50 years old now! The curve illustrates visually some basic elements of a theory to describe the how and why, and at what rate, new technologies are distributed and accepted by society. I can see why a theory like this would have been developed post-WWII, as it was definitely a major era of innovation, and acceptance and diffusion of what were quite new technologies into the general consumer market was a really revolutionary thing in the 1950s.

So Let’s start with the Parameters

So the Model first captures the relative time scale in terms of when different types of people adopt technology. Then the curve also allocates a general ballpark in terms of relative percentages of the overall market share for a product or service. Obviously all the numbers are pretty streamlined and it forms a pretty neat curve. But I would like to look into the research that backs up the model at some stage. Continue reading

Understanding the Critical Path – R. Buckminster Fuller’s Masterwork – Part One

I first heard of R. Buckminster Fuller when I attended the Global Entrepreneurship Summit 2018 (look up #GES2018 on Twitter) in Brisbane. Part of the weekend’s events was the launching of what they called the World Game, which was basically an en masse mobilisation of entrepreneurs from all over the world towards making impacts towards achieving the 17 U.N. Sustainable Development Goals. It’s really hard to sum it up in a few words, but it was a pretty inspiring concept. And actually, the World Game was originally the brain-child of R. Buckminster Fuller, who has been dubbed “one of the finest minds and most significant thinkers of the Modern Age.” Quite an accolade to hold!

So I went away excited for the concept of the World Game, and did a little research into the man. Most people who have heard of him think of him as the “geodesic dome” guy. But his World Game was basically a blueprint for global cooperation to no longer be constrained by the economic mental concept of scarcity and a lack mindset. Ultimately, we live in a universe where neither matter nor energy is created or destroyed, right? So its ultimately more about flow and transformation. Phew, mind-blowing stuff! Well, I really wanted to do a review of his book. (This will most likely end up as several posts, as it really is such an immensely deep book!) I thought the best place to start was at the beginning and understanding the critical path – what that actually means.

So What is the Critical Path?

I could imagine your thoughts would be the same as mine when you read the book title – “So what is the Critical Path?” Continue reading

Looking at Emotional Intelligence and Leadership – A Review of Some of Daniel Goleman’s Books

I read a lot of books! I honestly find it hard to keep track of them all sometimes! (That’s part of why I really love Goodreads…) When I read great books, I definitely love sharing them with friends who I know are interested in similar things, as integrating new ideas found in books can honestly be life-changing. As a University student, I always have readings in textbooks and journal articles for my lectures and workshops – and assessments, of course. So you could imagine I would not be too interested in going beyond that and reading more. But I have found so much to enrich my personal learning and even my studies from other books.

As a student of HRM, I have to say that Daniel Goleman’s books have really given me so much value. I’ve read several of his books. He writes really simply while obviously referencing a lot of background research. Several of his books relate to ideas centred around emotional intelligence and leadership, and building on this, he has gone on to present research on social intelligence and how our brains are wired for social relationships.

Some Background to the Topic

Emotional Intelligence as a concept has been around since the 90s, and so many books have been written about the subject. A lot of research has gone into the topic, and related topics, and especially the relationship between emotional intelligence and leadership. The amazing thing about EQ is that although there are trait-like qualities that could seem innate, there are ways that one can develop their EQ – both their ability to manage and understand their own emotions, as well as understanding and even handling the emotions of others.

One area of EQ that deeply intrigues me and definitely is a cause for me want to investigate it more deeply is the connection between EQ and neuroscience. It is amazing to consider the complexity of the human brain, and even how there are different elements that make it up. There is the basest part of our brain that controls instinctual elements and fight/flight response, what is often called the reptilian brain. Then there is the more feeling part of our brain that processes sensory inputs in terms of how it makes us feel, and can even register the feelings of others, and it can do some really amazing things! Then there is the more rational part of our brain that applies logic to make decisions. In the past, often emotions were considered a hindrance to making good decisions. But research has gone on to suggest that in fact emotions are just as much a part of good decision-making as rationality, and thus, EQ is a key to both good management and leadership. Continue reading

The Beginning of My Journey in Exploring Business Ethics

Today was a great day, and the end of a great week of studying. Already arrived at week four of my current trimester. (Here at Griffith University we study in blocks of twelve weeks, so that’s basically a quarter of the way to the end of another course of new learning.) So, this trimester I’m studying Digital & Social Media Marketing, Negotiation, Business Ethics & Corporate Governance, and Japanese 1B. As you could imagine, student life is already picking up towards those first major mid-semester assessments. Just finished my first online quiz for Japanese yesterday. On Sunday I have my Negotiation Plan for a negotiation between the management of a dairy company (that I have been assigned to represent) and the Union, looking to create a first-time Enterprise Bargaining Agreement. Then at the end of next week, before our mid-semester break, I’ve got my Research component (Situation Analysis, SWOT Analysis, Personas and Digital Challenge Assessment) as the basis for my Digital Marketing Campaign plan due at the end of my Digital Marketing course! Phew, so yeah, I’m a busy boy right now!

Well, getting back to today! Our workshop in Business Ethics and Corporate Governance was putting the finishing touches on the first module of our studies, looking at the basic theoretical frameworks of ethical decision-making. It is pretty philosophical, but I’m really glad for what I’m learning. It is definitely laying a good foundation from which I can begin exploring business ethics over the rest of the course, looking at various case studies. We’re going to be begin our investigation with the “AWB & Iraqi Oil for Food Scandal”. Honestly, its way more interesting than it might sound!

Why Business Ethics?

To some, the concept of “business ethics” is a contradiction in terms. However, as in any area of life, there are ways to conduct business while keeping ethical considerations in mind – and not just the money. Ethics itself is the study of morality, and delves into the realm of philosophy, considering what is the best rationale for determining what is right and wrong, what is the best decision to be made in any particular situation. Similar to the pluralist society that we live in, where there are many interests represented and power is to some extent decentralized, so there are many ethical perspectives that should be taken into account when making a decision in business that could impact on the society in which we live. Continue reading

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