Tag: decision making

A Big Weekend: 3 Day Startup Development & Lean Canvas

Phew, its already week nine of second trimester, and exams are definitely looming! The pace of life at Uni is reaching fever-pitch, though for some of us, maybe our major assessment tasks for the trimester have been submitted? It might be the eye of the storm for a little bit? Well, this weekend I was involved with the 3-Day Startup Workshop Weekend, and I really wanted to share a bit about it, and my experience of it.

It was definitely an experience that I highly recommend everyone take part in! There were certainly elements of it that were pretty grueling! But it was an amazing learning experience over all – and there’s free food and a great chance to network and make new friends!

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Why I Chose to Cage My Night Owl and Become An Early Bird

There are so many things that I know have been of great benefit to me of late, different choices that I’ve made to finally embrace some basic common sense notions of life and wisdom that actually work. One of the key things that I knew that I needed to put into place early if I was ever going to succeed in achieving my ultimate goals was to adjust my whole sleeping routine. It seems kind of appropriate for a Pidgeon to be teaching you about Owls and Early Birds, right?

Well, ever since I was a baby (my mum told me) I was never one for sleep or eating for that matter. I always wanted to be doing stuff, always wanted to be where the action was. Well, combine that with a student lifestyle that doesn’t really require much discipline if I don’t want it to, and that can spell trouble! I’m definitely more naturally a night owl. I love to stay up late reading, playing games, watching movies. So it took a very concerted effort (and still does, to be honest, to some degree) for me to become an early bird! But I know that there are so many good reasons why I wanted to make the change – and why I reckon you should consider it too. Continue reading

Without Direction, Information Alone is Worthless (A Parable)

Imagine for a moment, you arrive in Paris airport. You’re all really excited, a bit nervous. It’s your first time in Europe, let alone France – and you don’t really speak much French, except a little you learned in high school.

So where to from there? You try to get some help. You manage to get a map. Great! This big map of Paris – its got the whole city mapped out. It’s got everything you’d want to know, right? It tells you the whole story… But where am I on this map? And where am I wanting to get to? Hmm, see how a map by itself is pretty useless. That’s what it’s like with information. Information alone is worthless without direction.

They are very different concepts, though obviously they both have their place. Continue reading

My Unexpected Revolutionary Tipping Point

Every one has those moments in their life where the crisis hits, that watershed moment where you have a choice that must be made, and which way you decide to go with determine so much of what is ahead. Often the powerful thing about such moments is that your past doesn’t automatically have to be your reference point for where you go from there. It can be a moment of revival, redirection.

The past few years of my life especially actually feel like a journey from one such point to another really. But this morning, I wanted to share with you what must be one of the latest ones for me. It was definitely unexpected and unplanned for, but how I embraced it made it truly a revolutionary tipping point – a key to unlocking my personal development towards so many deep desires that I have had for a long time.

My hope in sharing a bit of my story is that when that moment comes for you, that you could embrace it and make the choice that could set your path on so much a more awesome trajectory that you could have hoped for or imagined! Sounds too good to be true? Well, read on and see. This is me! Continue reading

Where Do You Fall on the Diffusion of Innovation Curve?

Have you heard of the diffusion of innovation curve? I first encountered this model in my Intro to Marketing course last year (2017). I actually never realised that the model was more than 50 years old now! The curve illustrates visually some basic elements of a theory to describe the how and why, and at what rate, new technologies are distributed and accepted by society. I can see why a theory like this would have been developed post-WWII, as it was definitely a major era of innovation, and acceptance and diffusion of what were quite new technologies into the general consumer market was a really revolutionary thing in the 1950s.

So Let’s start with the Parameters

So the Model first captures the relative time scale in terms of when different types of people adopt technology. Then the curve also allocates a general ballpark in terms of relative percentages of the overall market share for a product or service. Obviously all the numbers are pretty streamlined and it forms a pretty neat curve. But I would like to look into the research that backs up the model at some stage. Continue reading

How the Digital Layer Brings Us to Transcending our Natural Limitations of Time & Space

Now, I’ve been actually stewing on the topic of this post for a while now! At the very least, it has definitely been in my consciousness for nearly two months now, since I first watched this video of Elon Musk being interviewed at the Code Conference 2016: “We are already cyborgs”.

As he spoke about our brain and how it processes our sensory inputs, and even how there are those different layers in our brain, so to speak, that deal with more the “low road” emotional stuff versus that “high road” part of our brain that is more about logic and reason. But all of that is still tied in to a very limited information process. We are hard-wired to mostly deal with what is right in front of us now. Really this is a pretty functional limitation for most of human history.

To survive in a tooth and nail world, that really helped. But to face the problems of our age, global problems, it really does require something else. It is that digital layer that Elon Musk speaks about that makes me think, “This is how we could go about transcending our natural limitations of time and space,” how we can get away from being limited by nature to just dealing with what is in front of our nose, and missing the immense and impactful (but intensely subtle and often slow) processes that are going on around us every day.

Something I Read Today in Critical Path

This all made me think today of something I read in R. Buckminster Fuller’s book, Critical Path:

“I have discovered that one of the important characteristics of most economic trends is that they are too slow in their motion to be visible to humans. We cannot see the motion of the stars, the atoms, a whirling airplane propeller, the growth of a tree, or the hour or minute hand of a clock. In the latter case we can see only the movement of the second hand. Humans do not get out of the way of that which they cannot see moving. As with the electromagnetic spectrum, most of the frequencies and motions of Universe are ultra or infra to man’s sensorial tunability.” Continue reading

The Beginning of My Journey in Exploring Business Ethics

Today was a great day, and the end of a great week of studying. Already arrived at week four of my current trimester. (Here at Griffith University we study in blocks of twelve weeks, so that’s basically a quarter of the way to the end of another course of new learning.) So, this trimester I’m studying Digital & Social Media Marketing, Negotiation, Business Ethics & Corporate Governance, and Japanese 1B. As you could imagine, student life is already picking up towards those first major mid-semester assessments. Just finished my first online quiz for Japanese yesterday. On Sunday I have my Negotiation Plan for a negotiation between the management of a dairy company (that I have been assigned to represent) and the Union, looking to create a first-time Enterprise Bargaining Agreement. Then at the end of next week, before our mid-semester break, I’ve got my Research component (Situation Analysis, SWOT Analysis, Personas and Digital Challenge Assessment) as the basis for my Digital Marketing Campaign plan due at the end of my Digital Marketing course! Phew, so yeah, I’m a busy boy right now!

Well, getting back to today! Our workshop in Business Ethics and Corporate Governance was putting the finishing touches on the first module of our studies, looking at the basic theoretical frameworks of ethical decision-making. It is pretty philosophical, but I’m really glad for what I’m learning. It is definitely laying a good foundation from which I can begin exploring business ethics over the rest of the course, looking at various case studies. We’re going to be begin our investigation with the “AWB & Iraqi Oil for Food Scandal”. Honestly, its way more interesting than it might sound!

Why Business Ethics?

To some, the concept of “business ethics” is a contradiction in terms. However, as in any area of life, there are ways to conduct business while keeping ethical considerations in mind – and not just the money. Ethics itself is the study of morality, and delves into the realm of philosophy, considering what is the best rationale for determining what is right and wrong, what is the best decision to be made in any particular situation. Similar to the pluralist society that we live in, where there are many interests represented and power is to some extent decentralized, so there are many ethical perspectives that should be taken into account when making a decision in business that could impact on the society in which we live. Continue reading

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