Tag: social intelligence

My Unexpected Revolutionary Tipping Point

Every one has those moments in their life where the crisis hits, that watershed moment where you have a choice that must be made, and which way you decide to go with determine so much of what is ahead. Often the powerful thing about such moments is that your past doesn’t automatically have to be your reference point for where you go from there. It can be a moment of revival, redirection.

The past few years of my life especially actually feel like a journey from one such point to another really. But this morning, I wanted to share with you what must be one of the latest ones for me. It was definitely unexpected and unplanned for, but how I embraced it made it truly a revolutionary tipping point – a key to unlocking my personal development towards so many deep desires that I have had for a long time.

My hope in sharing a bit of my story is that when that moment comes for you, that you could embrace it and make the choice that could set your path on so much a more awesome trajectory that you could have hoped for or imagined! Sounds too good to be true? Well, read on and see. This is me! Continue reading

Where Do You Fall on the Diffusion of Innovation Curve?

Have you heard of the diffusion of innovation curve? I first encountered this model in my Intro to Marketing course last year (2017). I actually never realised that the model was more than 50 years old now! The curve illustrates visually some basic elements of a theory to describe the how and why, and at what rate, new technologies are distributed and accepted by society. I can see why a theory like this would have been developed post-WWII, as it was definitely a major era of innovation, and acceptance and diffusion of what were quite new technologies into the general consumer market was a really revolutionary thing in the 1950s.

So Let’s start with the Parameters

So the Model first captures the relative time scale in terms of when different types of people adopt technology. Then the curve also allocates a general ballpark in terms of relative percentages of the overall market share for a product or service. Obviously all the numbers are pretty streamlined and it forms a pretty neat curve. But I would like to look into the research that backs up the model at some stage. Continue reading

Cultivating a Growth Mindset – A Pun on Words

Well, this afternoon I’m back at Garden City, and checking out the new Library’s “quiet area”. It really is quite nice! I’ve got a seat at a desk facing the internal windows, and the library is quite a buzz right now. It really has a positive vibe here, fresh and new and local community space.

Anyway, as I was saying in the title, I was going to write about a few of the things that I’m doing in my life, “cultivating a growth mindset” – definitely, with a pun very much intended.

Those of you who have been following my blog would have read my post about getting involved in your local community garden. Well, earlier this afternoon I dropped by Salisbury Community Garden.

First Visit to My Local Community Garden

For those who haven’t read my initial post, here’s the link back to that. Continue reading

Looking at Emotional Intelligence and Leadership – A Review of Some of Daniel Goleman’s Books

I read a lot of books! I honestly find it hard to keep track of them all sometimes! (That’s part of why I really love Goodreads…) When I read great books, I definitely love sharing them with friends who I know are interested in similar things, as integrating new ideas found in books can honestly be life-changing. As a University student, I always have readings in textbooks and journal articles for my lectures and workshops – and assessments, of course. So you could imagine I would not be too interested in going beyond that and reading more. But I have found so much to enrich my personal learning and even my studies from other books.

As a student of HRM, I have to say that Daniel Goleman’s books have really given me so much value. I’ve read several of his books. He writes really simply while obviously referencing a lot of background research. Several of his books relate to ideas centred around emotional intelligence and leadership, and building on this, he has gone on to present research on social intelligence and how our brains are wired for social relationships.

Some Background to the Topic

Emotional Intelligence as a concept has been around since the 90s, and so many books have been written about the subject. A lot of research has gone into the topic, and related topics, and especially the relationship between emotional intelligence and leadership. The amazing thing about EQ is that although there are trait-like qualities that could seem innate, there are ways that one can develop their EQ – both their ability to manage and understand their own emotions, as well as understanding and even handling the emotions of others.

One area of EQ that deeply intrigues me and definitely is a cause for me want to investigate it more deeply is the connection between EQ and neuroscience. It is amazing to consider the complexity of the human brain, and even how there are different elements that make it up. There is the basest part of our brain that controls instinctual elements and fight/flight response, what is often called the reptilian brain. Then there is the more feeling part of our brain that processes sensory inputs in terms of how it makes us feel, and can even register the feelings of others, and it can do some really amazing things! Then there is the more rational part of our brain that applies logic to make decisions. In the past, often emotions were considered a hindrance to making good decisions. But research has gone on to suggest that in fact emotions are just as much a part of good decision-making as rationality, and thus, EQ is a key to both good management and leadership. Continue reading

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